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diabetes

Helpful Tips for Those Living with Diabetes

  • Posted Nov 13, 2018
  • hchadmin

 

It's not easy finding out that you or a loved one has diabetes. However, educating yourself about this disease is the first step toward feeling better and living a longer and healthier life.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 30.3 million Americans – 9.4 percent of the U.S. population – are living with diabetes. Another 84.1 million have prediabetes, a condition that if not treated often leads to type 2 diabetes within five years. November is American Diabetes Month and Holy Cross Hospital would like to help you Live Your Whole Life by providing some helpful tips for managing diabetes.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) offers the following suggestions to help navigate treatment if you or a loved one has been diagnosed:
•    Create a health care team. Finding the right team of skilled health professionals will help you manage your diabetes and get the most out of your care. Ask your doctor to help you build a team to assist you in reaching your goals and feeling better. As part of the care management resources available to you, you may receive an outreach call from a nurse. When a nurse calls, please be sure to return the call and take advantages of the services offered to you.

•    Be the star player on your team. Self care is the best way to maintain your good health. You can help keep yourself well by eating right, staying active, taking your medicine, monitoring your blood glucose and making and keeping doctor appointments.

•    Keep a close eye on your blood glucose levels. Your doctor may want you to start checking your glucose (or blood sugar) levels at home. If so, you will need a small machine called a blood glucose meter. Your health care team can help you find the best meter for your needs. Keeping your blood glucose levels in a healthy range is key to controlling your diabetes.

•    Take your prescribed medications. To help keep your blood glucose in the target range, it’s vital that you take your medications as prescribed by your doctor. If you believe you’re having side effects, be sure to call your doctor or pharmacist.

As you know, developing and maintaining a relationship with a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice. If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

When you’re being treated for a disease or condition, it may not always be easy to decide where to go for care. For anything that is considered a life-threatening situation (like chest pain, major injuries or sudden and severe pain) it’s best to go to the emergency room.  For less severe matters that still require immediate attention, if you can’t get in to see your PCP, going to an urgent care facility can save you time and money.

Even if you require emergency or urgent care for your health situation, it’s always best to have a relationship with a PCP who knows your history and understands what is happening with your health over time.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to helping you Live Your Whole Life by nurturing well-being through body, mind and spirit.

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Live Healthier and Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

  • Posted Oct 30, 2018
  • hchadmin

Did you know that by simply living a healthier lifestyle, you could dramatically reduce the possibility of developing type 2 diabetes? 

In fact, recent studies by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) report that by engaging in physical activity, eating a healthier diet, maintaining an appropriate body weight, limiting alcohol consumption and not smoking you can cut your risk of diabetes by as much as 80 percent.

November is American Diabetes Month and Holy Cross Hospital would like to take this opportunity to encourage you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, by reminding you of the importance of preventive care.  

NIH studies show that having a body weight appropriate for your height and age by itself reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 60 to 70 percent. Eating a healthier diet reduced the risk by about 15 percent and not smoking lowered the risk by about 20 percent.

Here are some tips from the NIH and the National Diabetes Education Program to help you make gradual lifestyle changes that can help you prevent type 2 diabetes:


If you are overweight, set a weight loss goal you can meet (check with your doctor before starting any weight loss plan). 

Aim to lose about 5 to 7 percent of your current weight and keep it off 

Keep track of your daily food intake and physical activity in a logbook and review it daily 

For support, invite family and friends to get involved


Make healthier food choices every day. 

Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work

Pack healthier lunches for you and your family

Choose low-fat dairy products

Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal

Select lean meats and poultry

Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources

 

Strive to become more physically active. It’s easy to build physical activity into your day:

Take a brisk walk during lunchtime

Take the stairs instead of the elevator or park farther away from your office

Join a community program like the YMCA as a family and choose activities that everyone can enjoy

 

Restrict alcohol consumption. Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes rises with an increase in alcohol consumption. Limit yourself to no more than one drink a day.

If you smoke, quit (and don’t quit quitting). Smokefree.gov offers some great tips and a step-by-step guide on how to begin.


Be sure to embrace a healthy spirit. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), high levels of stress can have negative effects on your blood sugar levels. That’s why it’s important to practice good relaxation techniques. The ADA recommends the following: 

Breathing exercises – Sit or lie down and uncross your legs and arms. Take in a deep breath. Then push out as much air as you can then relax your muscles. Do these exercises for a minimum of five minutes at least once a day.

Replace negative thoughts with positive ones – If a negative thought is going through your mind, replace it with something that makes you happy or peaceful. You may also visualize a favorite nature scene to lessen anxiety and promote more serenity. 

Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and helping prevent diseases like diabetes. Having a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice. 

If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.

[Disclaimer: Trinity Health is a Catholic healthcare facility that is firmly committed to maintaining fidelity to its Catholic identity by closely conforming to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services (ERDs).  Smokefree.gov and the links it provides are independent sites and have no obligation to provide information that is always congruent with the ERDs. Trinity Health cannot guarantee their content and ask your discretion when using information from this site.]

 
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Physical Activity Offers Great Benefits to Those Living with a Health Condition

  • Posted May 01, 2018
  • hchadmin

Did you know that according to the American Heart Association (AHA), active people who have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or other chronic health conditions are more likely to live healthier for a longer period of time than inactive people with the same conditions?

Actve children


The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says that physical activity can help lower your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. It also reduces your risk for stroke, relieves stress and anxiety and strengthens your heart, muscles and bones.

These benefits are important for everyone, but especially for those with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes and depression.

Because of the symptoms they experience, those who live with illness may find it challenging to get regular physical activity. The ADA and AHA offer the following tips:
•    Look for opportunities to be more active during the day. Walk the mall before shopping, take the stairs instead of the escalator or take 10–15 minute breaks for walking or some other activity while watching TV or sitting.
•    Don't get discouraged if you stop for a while. Get started again gradually and work up to your old pace.
•    Don't participate in physical activities right after meals or when it's very hot or humid.
•    It is recommended that diabetics check blood glucose before and after activity (if it’s too low, eat a piece of fruit, a few crackers or drink a glass of milk) and carry a snack to eat if you’ll be active for a few hours or more. If you have one, wear your medical alert I.D.
•    You can do this even if you've been sedentary for a long time, are overweight, have a high risk of coronary heart disease or some other chronic health condition. See your doctor for a medical evaluation before beginning a physical activity program.

In addition to getting regular physical activity, developing and maintaining a relationship with a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health.

A PCP typically specializes in family medicine, internal medicine or general practice. If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

When you’re being treated for a health condition, it may not always be easy to decide where to go for care. For anything that is considered a life-threatening situation (like chest pain or sudden and severe pain) it’s best to go to the emergency room. For less severe matters that still require immediate attention, if you can’t get in to see your PCP, going to an urgent care facility can save you time and money.

Even if you require emergency or urgent care for your health situation, it’s always best to have a relationship with a PCP who knows your history and understands what is happening with your health over time.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote well-being through body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.


Lowering Your Risk for Disease with Good Nutrition

  • Posted Feb 28, 2018
  • hchadmin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics eating a healthier diet is one of the first lines of defense in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and heart disease?

March is National Nutrition Month and Holy Cross Hospital encourages you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, through healthier eating, spiritual well-being and preventive care. 

The American Diabetes Association says that eating healthy is one of the most important things we can do to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Additionally, research by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows that following a healthier diet can help prevent high blood pressure and may lower blood pressure that is already over the normal range.   

Below are some tips from the NIH to help you make healthier food choices every day:

• Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work
• Pack healthier lunches for you and your family
• Choose low-fat diary products
• Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal
• Select lean meats and poultry
• Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources

Another great way to reduce your risk of developing disease is by maintaining spiritual wellness. According to Mental Health America, there is a connection between spirituality and health. Spirituality can reduce the stress that often drives disease.  Holy Cross offers the following suggestions to keep your good health:

• Discover and rediscover what makes your life meaningful. Find what brings your life purpose and align your choices with it. Wherever your passion is, there you’ll find your purpose.
• Nurture your connection with God/your Higher Power through regular spiritual practices.  Some people choose prayer, others meditate, some read Scripture, and others walk through nature. Whatever helps you in your relationship with the Divine, make time to foster your awareness of the Sacred. 
• The Center for Engaged Spirituality provides lots of information on various spiritual practices.
• Connect with others who share your values. Having meaningful relationships with others, with focus on what is important to us, reminds us that we are not alone and can often bring joy to our lives.
• Find opportunities to serve. Helping others in need, either through volunteer work or some other means, nurtures our spirit when we feel our actions make a positive difference for other people. 
Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and preventing diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. Having a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice.


If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote your well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.


Know Your Diabetes Risk

  • Posted Nov 07, 2017
  • hchadmin

According to the American Diabetes Association, every 17 seconds, someone is diagnosed with diabetes. That’s why, during American Diabetes Month, Holy Cross Hospital would like to encourage you to care for yourself and your loved ones by reminding you of the importance of having regular health screenings to help identify your risk for type 2 diabetes. If you haven’t had your annual screening yet, make an appointment today! Click below to learn more about your diabetes risk. 

Click here for the pdf of the prediabetes flier.


Live Healthier and Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

  • Posted Oct 24, 2017
  • hchadmin

Did you know that by simply living a healthier lifestyle, you could dramatically reduce the possibility of developing type 2 diabetes? 

In fact, recent studies by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) report that by engaging in physical activity, eating a healthier diet, maintaining an appropriate body weight, limiting alcohol consumption and not smoking you can cut your risk of diabetes by as much as 80 percent.

November is American Diabetes Month and Holy Cross Hospital would like to take this opportunity to encourage you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, by reminding you of the importance of preventive care.  

NIH studies show that having a body weight appropriate for your height and age by itself reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 60 to 70 percent. Eating a healthier diet reduced the risk by about 15 percent and not smoking lowered the risk by about 20 percent.

Here are some tips from the NIH and the National Diabetes Education Program to help you make gradual lifestyle changes that can help you prevent type 2 diabetes:

If you are overweight, set a weight loss goal you can meet (check with your doctor before starting any weight loss plan). 

Aim to lose about 5 to 7 percent of your current weight and keep it off 

Keep track of your daily food intake and physical activity in a logbook and review it daily 

For support, invite family and friends to get involved


Make healthier food choices every day. 

Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work

Pack healthier lunches for you and your family

Choose low-fat dairy products

Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal

Select lean meats and poultry

Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources


Strive to become more physically active. It’s easy to build physical activity into your day:

Take a brisk walk during lunchtime

Take the stairs instead of the elevator or park farther away from your office

Join a community program like the YMCA as a family and choose activities that everyone can enjoy


Restrict alcohol consumption. Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes rises with an increase in alcohol consumption. Limit yourself to no more than one drink a day.

If you smoke, quit (and don’t quit quitting). Smokefree.gov offers some great tips and a step-by-step guide on how to begin.

Be sure to embrace a healthy spirit. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), high levels of stress can have negative effects on your blood sugar levels. That’s why it’s important to practice good relaxation techniques. The ADA recommends the following: 

Breathing exercises – Sit or lie down and uncross your legs and arms. Take in a deep breath. Then push out as much air as you can then relax your muscles. Do these exercises for a minimum of five minutes at least once a day.

Replace negative thoughts with positive ones – If a negative thought is going through your mind, replace it with something that makes you happy or peaceful. You may also visualize a favorite nature scene to lessen anxiety and promote more serenity. 

Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and helping prevent diseases like diabetes. Having a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice. 

If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions or click here.

Holy Cross is committed to providing resources that promote well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.

[Disclaimer: Trinity Health is a Catholic healthcare facility that is firmly committed to maintaining fidelity to its Catholic identity by closely conforming to the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services (ERDs). 

Smokefree.gov and the links it provides are independent sites and have no obligation to provide information that is always congruent with the ERDs. Trinity Health cannot guarantee their content and ask your discretion when using information from this site.]

 
tags: 

Lowering Your Risk for Disease

  • Posted Jun 06, 2017
  • hchadmin

Did you know that according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics eating a healthier diet is one of the first lines of defense in the prevention of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease?

Holy Cross Hospital encourages you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, by reminding you of the importance of healthier eating, spiritual well-being and preventive care.  

The American Diabetes Association says that eating healthy is one of the most important things we can do to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Additionally, research by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows that following a healthier diet can help prevent high blood pressure and may lower blood pressure that is already over the normal range.    

Below are some tips from the NIH to help you make healthier food choices every day:

•Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work

•Pack healthier lunches for you and your family

•Choose low-fat diary products

•Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal

•Select lean meats and poultry

•Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources

Another great way to reduce your risk of developing disease is by maintaining spiritual wellness. According to Mental Health America, there is a connection between spirituality and health. Spirituality can reduce the stress that often drives disease. Holy Cross Hospital offers the following suggestions to keep your good health:

•Discover and rediscover what makes your life meaningful. Find what brings your life purpose and align your choices with it. Wherever your passion is, there you’ll find your purpose.

•Nurture your connection with God/your Higher Power through regular spiritual practices.  Some people choose prayer, others meditate, some read Scripture, others walk through nature. Whatever helps you in your relationship with the Divine, make time to foster your awareness of the Sacred.  

•Connect with others who share your values. Having meaningful relationships with others, which focus on what is important to us, reminds us that we are not alone and can often bring joy to our lives.

•Find opportunities to serve. Helping others in need, either through volunteer work or some other means, nurtures our spirit when we feel our actions make a positive difference for other people.  

Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and preventing diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. Having a Primary Care Physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice. 

If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions. Or click here. Stay on top of your health education by subscribing to our e-newsletter.


FREEDOM (Part II)

  • Posted Nov 22, 2012
  • Alan Niederman, MD, FACC, FACP

Cardiologists did not get the answer that we wanted the first time. In fact, even worse, we found that we were actually quite misinformed about what we were doing to patients, especially those with diabetes. Why is that so important?

A few factoids from the BARI 2D site
More than 24 million people in the United States have diabetes. 65% of those people die from either a stroke or heart disease. If you have diabetes, you have two to four times the risk of dying from heart disease than those patients who do not have diabetes. As mentioned in my last blog post, BARI took place between 1988-1991 and so did not represent "contemporary" medical practices. The 10 year survival rate of patients who had diabetes and angioplasty was only 44.1% vs 57% survival rate for those patients that had bypass surgery. This difference is statistically significant. Let me give you the real wake-up call. 10 year survival without diabetes was roughly 77% in both the angioplasty and surgery groups. Diabetes is a bad actor. This data made it very difficult for cardiologists to recommend angioplasty to patients, but because the study did not include drug eluting stents, which we were certain would save the situation, no real practice changes occurred.

BARI2D was set up to address the issue of strategies for myocardial ischemia and the treatment of diabetes. Full disclosure: I was an Investigator in this study. BARI2D studied intensive medical management of diabetes and the revascularization strategy. The goal was to achieve a hemoglobin a1c below 7.0%. Cardiologists then selected the choice of angioplasty or coronary bypass surgery before the patient was randomized. Recruitment began January 1, 2001, and the study ended November 30, 2008. Of the 2,368 patients only 30% were female. The mean age was 62.4 years. The patients were equally divided into one, two and three vessel disease. The duration of diabetes was 10.4 years. Hemoglobin a1c was 7.7% at baseline.

In those patients that had single vessel disease, 90% were intended to get angioplasty. If you had two vessel disease, 66% for angioplasty. If you had three vessel disease, 45% angioplasty. Remember that, one, cardiologists were making the choice, and two, the mortality for diabetics with angioplasty was 20% higher than surgery. Yet we were still willing to "water the tree of liberty." After three years, we lowered the LDL from 96 to 80. Hemoglobin a1c went from 7.8 to 7.5 in those patients taking insulin and from 7.8 to 7.2 in those patients taking non insulin management. At five years, either angioplasty or surgery took place in 42% of those patients that had their procedure deferred. In other words, nothing but medical management need to be done in the majority of patients who had their procedure deferred. Again, coronary disease is a medically treated illness in most cases. All cause mortality was 88% among the two groups. Those that got "fixed" early and those that got "fixed" late. Death/MI/Stroke was 76% in both groups. If you were intended to have surgery and received it, you had no difference in survival than if you had medication alone. If you add MI and stroke into the number, you did better if you had the surgery. Still, we cardiologists did not get the answer we wanted. So, we did another study!


Freedom (Part I)

  • Posted Nov 20, 2012
  • Alan Niederman, MD, FACC, FACP

Thomas Jefferson once said, "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants."  Is the same thing true of patients?  Must we physicians do the same work over and over again while we use "the blood of our patients" to prove a point which is known to be inaccurate.

In the Clint Eastwood movie Hang 'Em High, Pat Hingle plays Judge Adam Fenton.  Fenton is a Judge in the Oklahoma territory in the late 1880's.  Fenton was Judge, jury and executioner.  In much the same way, cardiologists are unique in having the patient, testing the patient and then making the decision for the patient as to what is to be done.  There is some discussion, or not, depending on the circumstances.  Same sitting angioplasty, the repair of the artery in the same procedure that is known as Ad Hoc angioplasty, does not allow for any discussion.  This is usually in the best interest of the patient.  In fact, Medicare reduces my payment by doing angioplasty and catheterization at the same time.

Let me break it down piece by piece.  I have blogged about our organization's documents known as appropriate use.  Those documents say in general that no patient should go to cardiac catheterization unless they are having a heart attack, have unstable angina, have a very large defect on nuclear stress testing or who are believed to have angina and are taking adequate medical management. This then leads to the second part of the equation.  The patients that receive catheterization need something done if possible after the cath because that's what it is for.  Angioplasty and bypass surgery are to relieve symptoms.  Except for special circumstances, they do not lead to longer life.  As my patients know, most of what is done in cardiology is done to prolong life.  That is the reason that people take statins.

So, the question becomes which is better at prolonging life and reducing symptoms, angioplasty or bypass surgery?  This question has been asked multiple times, and the answer is always the same.  No matter what we cardiologists do, no matter which drugs we have, and no matter what covers our stents surgery provides more benefits than angioplasty.

Several new wrinkles have been added.  The worst patients are the most common.   Those with diabetes, which as you know is endemic in our society, have the worst disease.  Diabetics develop more advanced and complex disease than patients without diabetes.  Our stents are excellent, and surgeons have different techniques.

Since the beginning of angioplasty, the limits of the procedure were tested.  The results of the procedures were tabulated in certain centers in a database held by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  The topic of "which is better long-term" then became more formalized.  The first study was the BARI study which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine (N Engl J Med 1996; 335: 217-225).  This study was all comers - those with and without diabetes.  Five-year survival for surgery was 89.3%.  Five-year survival for angioplasty was 86.3%.  However, if you had diabetes, then the five-year survival with surgery was 80.6%.  The five-year survival with angioplasty was 65.5%.

So what did we cardiologists do?  We did another study!!


Our Inactivity (Part II): Our tax dollars at work

  • Posted Oct 25, 2012
  • Alan Niederman, MD, FACC, FACP

I often write that there are some studies that will just never get done because of the logistics and the cost.  They are studies that require funding without a financial reward.  The reward might be a decrease in costs to "society" but drug companies and Wall Street do not function on a society level, they function on a quarterly earnings level.

It takes the government to fund these studies and continue them over long periods of time.  We have seen in the recent months that one political party thinks that this is not "government's" job, so in the future I don't know how this will work.  In the meantime, I am reporting on a large (over 5,000) patient study that went on for 11 years and is now over.

This study looks at a group of patients that number over 24 million in the United States.  This is a societal problem.  The downstream costs are huge.  The human suffering involved is real.

This study named Look AHEAD relates to my previous blog.  It attempted to answer the question, "if you have non insulin diabetes and have intensive lifestyle intervention (i.e. diet and exercise), can you avert the complications of cardiovascular events?"  This is a worthy goal and points to one of the "urban(medical) legends" that I am so fond of.

The party line is that if you lose weight and exercise, you don't need medicine for the treatment of your diabetes and in fact may reverse your diabetic state.  We doctors spend a considerable amount of time cajoling patients to do what we want them to do.  In fact, in addition to the diet and exercise, all patients were treated in the routine way.  They were given whatever medications they needed to keep control of their diabetes.

This study enrolled 5,145 patients who were 45-76 years old, and 60% of whom were women.  37% were from varying racial and ethnic groups.  This is different from most of the white male studies that are conducted. The intensive group had lost 5% of their weight at year four. In contrast, the control group lost 1%.

Well....it doesn't work.  What?  The study has now been stopped at 11 years because it has been deemed "futile."  It will never show a difference between diet, exercise and the rest of us in the prevention of cardiovascular events.  This study has not been formally published.  All we have is the news release from the National Institutes of Health who ran the study for the government.

Two important points: what does it say about us that even when we are given intensive counseling, we can only lose and keep off 5% of our body weight?  Really?  If you weigh 200 pounds, 5% is 10 pounds.  Is that all we can manage?  What is now going to happen is that Medicare will never pay to have anyone discuss weight loss with anyone as it clearly does no good.

I am back to my last blog post.  It is frightfully clear that we eat too  much and get too little motion.  I think given our current understanding that it is not just exercise.  As my last blog post shows, if you exercise but then sit all day, you are only marginally better off.  We need an overhaul of our lives.  Medical care is bankrupting us, and much of it is self-inflicted.

I do not know how to accomplish this.  Clearly, neither does the government.   Somehow, we need to join together to figure it out.


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Holy Cross Hospital is a nonprofit, Catholic hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, dedicated to innovative, high quality and compassionate care. For nearly six decades, Holy Cross has continuously expanded its services to provide leading-edge care for their patients in Florida and for those from elsewhere in the United States. Holy Cross also offers an International Services program to ensure that patients from outside the U.S. receive the care they need.

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