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healthy eating

Physical Activity Offers Great Benefits to Those Living with a Health Condition

  • Posted May 07, 2019
  • hchadmin

Did you know that according to the American Heart Association (AHA), active people who have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or other chronic health conditions are more likely to live healthier for a longer period of time than inactive people with the same conditions?

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) says that physical activity can help lower your blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol levels. It also reduces your risk for stroke, relieves stress and anxiety and strengthens your heart, muscles and bones.

These benefits are important for everyone, but especially for those with chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes and depression.
Because of the symptoms they experience, those who live with illness may find it challenging to get regular physical activity. The ADA and AHA offer the following tips:

•    Look for opportunities to be more active during the day. Walk the mall before shopping, take the stairs instead of the escalator or take 10–15 minute breaks for walking or some other activity while watching TV or sitting. (or join us at the upcoming May 18 Walk to Cure Arthritis!)
•    Don't get discouraged if you stop for a while. Get started again gradually and work up to your old pace.
•    Don't participate in physical activities right after meals or when it's very hot or humid.
•    It is recommended that diabetics check blood glucose before and after activity (if it’s too low, eat a piece of fruit, a few crackers or drink a glass of milk) and carry a snack to eat if you’ll be active for a few hours or more. If you have one, wear your medical alert I.D.
•    You can do this even if you've been sedentary for a long time, are overweight, have a high risk of coronary heart disease or some other chronic health condition. See your doctor for a medical evaluation before beginning a physical activity program.

In addition to getting regular physical activity, developing and maintaining a relationship with a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health.

A PCP typically specializes in family medicine, internal medicine or general practice. If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

When you’re being treated for a health condition, it may not always be easy to decide where to go for care. For anything that is considered a life-threatening situation (like chest pain or sudden and severe pain) it’s best to go to the emergency room. For less severe matters that still require immediate attention, if you can’t get in to see your PCP, going to an urgent care facility can save you time and money.

Even if you require emergency or urgent care for your health situation, it’s always best to have a relationship with a PCP who knows your history and understands what is happening with your health over time.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.


Keys to Well-being: Eating Healthier, Getting Regular Screenings, Knowing Your Numbers

  • Posted Mar 05, 2019
  • Christine Walker

Mom was right when she told us to eat all of our veggies and listen to what our doctors tell us to do to maintain our good health. But, according to recent studies from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it seems that many of us are not taking mom’s advice to heart.

According to the CDC, only 9.3 percent of Americans meet daily intake recommendations for total vegetables (this includes dark green and orange veggies) and just 12.2 percent of Americans eat the two to four recommended daily servings of fruit.

That’s why, during National Nutrition Month, Holy Cross Hospital encourages you to care for yourself and your loved ones by reminding you of the importance of eating healthier and getting regular health screenings.

The federal government has published recommended dietary guidelines designed to promote general health and reduce the risk of chronic diseases and obesity. You can start following the guidelines by:

•    Following a healthier eating pattern across the lifespan
•    Focusing on variety, nutrient density and amount
•    Limiting calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reducing sodium intake
•    Shifting to healthier food and beverage choices
•    Supporting healthier eating patterns for all

Making these changes can help you keep your biometric numbers (like blood pressure, blood sugar, weight, etc.) in a healthier range.

The best way to find out if your numbers are within a healthy range for your gender, height and age is to have annual health screenings with your primary care physician (PCP). Annual health screenings are 100 percent covered by your health insurance as preventive care.

Having a PCP who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. If you don’t have a PCP, just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote your well-being though body, mind and spirit.

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Lowering Your Risk for Disease

  • Posted Feb 26, 2019
  • hchadmin



Did you know that according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics eating a healthier diet is one of the first lines of defense in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and heart disease?

March is National Nutrition Month and Holy Cross Hospital would like to encourage you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, by reminding you of the importance of healthier eating, spiritual well-being and preventive care.  

The American Diabetes Association says that healthier eating is one of the most important things we can do to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Additionally, research by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows that following a healthier diet can help prevent high blood pressure and may lower blood pressure that is already over the normal range.    

Below are some tips from the NIH to help you make healthier food choices every day:

•Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work

•Pack healthier lunches for you and your family

•Choose low-fat diary products

•Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal

•Select lean meats and poultry

•Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources

Another great way to reduce your risk of developing disease is by maintaining spiritual wellness. According to Mental Health America, there is a connection between spirituality and health. Spirituality can reduce the stress that often drives disease. Holy Cross Hospital offers the following suggestions to keep your good health:

•Discover and rediscover what makes your life meaningful. Find what brings your life purpose and align your choices with it. Wherever your passion is, there you’ll find your purpose.

•Nurture your connection with God/your Higher Power through regular spiritual practices.  Some people choose prayer, others meditate, some read Scripture, and others walk through nature. Whatever helps you in your relationship with the Divine, make time to foster your awareness of the Sacred.  

•Connect with others who share your values. Having meaningful relationships with others, with focus on what is important to us, reminds us that we are not alone and can often bring joy to our lives.

•Find opportunities to serve. Helping others in need, either through volunteer work or some other means, nurtures our spirit when we feel our actions make a positive difference for other people.  

Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and preventing diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. Having a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in family medicine, internal medicine or general practice. 

If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

As you’re your Trusted Health Partner for Life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote your well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.

categories: 

Keys to Well-being: Eating Healthier, Getting Regular Screenings, Knowing Your Numbers

  • Posted Mar 13, 2018
  • hchadmin

food

 

 

 

 

 

Mom was right when she told us to eat all of our veggies and listen to what our doctors tell us to do to maintain our good health. But, according to recent studies from  the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it seems that many of us are not taking mom’s advice to heart.

According to the CDC, at least 88 percent of Americans failed to meet daily intake recommendations for total vegetables (this includes dark green and orange veggies) and three-quarters of Americans don't eat the two to four recommended daily servings of fruit.

That’s why, during National Nutrition Month, Holy Cross Hospital encourages you to care for yourself and your loved ones by eating healthier and getting regular health screenings.

The federal government has published recommended dietary guidelines designed to promote general health and reduce the risk of chronic diseases and obesity.

You can start following the guidelines by:
• Following a healthy eating pattern across the lifespan
• Focusing on variety, nutrient density and amount
• Limiting calories from added sugars and saturated fats and reducing sodium intake
• Shifting to healthier food and beverage choices
• Supporting healthier eating patterns for all

Making these changes can help you keep your biometric numbers (like blood pressure, blood sugar, weight, etc.) in a healthy range.

The best way to find out if your numbers are within a healthy range for your gender, height and age is to have your annual screenings with your primary care physician (PCP). Annual health screenings are 100 percent covered by your health insurance as preventive care.

Having a PCP who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. If you don’t have a PCP, just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote your well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.


Lowering Your Risk for Disease with Good Nutrition

  • Posted Feb 28, 2018
  • hchadmin

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics eating a healthier diet is one of the first lines of defense in the prevention of type 2 diabetes and heart disease?

March is National Nutrition Month and Holy Cross Hospital encourages you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, through healthier eating, spiritual well-being and preventive care. 

The American Diabetes Association says that eating healthy is one of the most important things we can do to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Additionally, research by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows that following a healthier diet can help prevent high blood pressure and may lower blood pressure that is already over the normal range.   

Below are some tips from the NIH to help you make healthier food choices every day:

• Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work
• Pack healthier lunches for you and your family
• Choose low-fat diary products
• Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal
• Select lean meats and poultry
• Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources

Another great way to reduce your risk of developing disease is by maintaining spiritual wellness. According to Mental Health America, there is a connection between spirituality and health. Spirituality can reduce the stress that often drives disease.  Holy Cross offers the following suggestions to keep your good health:

• Discover and rediscover what makes your life meaningful. Find what brings your life purpose and align your choices with it. Wherever your passion is, there you’ll find your purpose.
• Nurture your connection with God/your Higher Power through regular spiritual practices.  Some people choose prayer, others meditate, some read Scripture, and others walk through nature. Whatever helps you in your relationship with the Divine, make time to foster your awareness of the Sacred. 
• The Center for Engaged Spirituality provides lots of information on various spiritual practices.
• Connect with others who share your values. Having meaningful relationships with others, with focus on what is important to us, reminds us that we are not alone and can often bring joy to our lives.
• Find opportunities to serve. Helping others in need, either through volunteer work or some other means, nurtures our spirit when we feel our actions make a positive difference for other people. 
Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and preventing diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. Having a primary care physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice.


If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions.

As your trusted health partner for life, Holy Cross Hospital is committed to providing resources that promote your well-being though body, mind and spirit and is dedicated to helping you Live Your Whole Life.


Lowering Your Risk for Disease

  • Posted Jun 06, 2017
  • hchadmin

Did you know that according to the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics eating a healthier diet is one of the first lines of defense in the prevention of Type 2 diabetes and heart disease?

Holy Cross Hospital encourages you to care for yourself, and your loved ones, by reminding you of the importance of healthier eating, spiritual well-being and preventive care.  

The American Diabetes Association says that eating healthy is one of the most important things we can do to lower the risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Additionally, research by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) shows that following a healthier diet can help prevent high blood pressure and may lower blood pressure that is already over the normal range.    

Below are some tips from the NIH to help you make healthier food choices every day:

•Keep healthier snacks, such as fruit and vegetables, at home and at work

•Pack healthier lunches for you and your family

•Choose low-fat diary products

•Eat whole-grain cereals, breads, crackers, brown rice, pasta or oatmeal

•Select lean meats and poultry

•Choose more fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds as protein sources

Another great way to reduce your risk of developing disease is by maintaining spiritual wellness. According to Mental Health America, there is a connection between spirituality and health. Spirituality can reduce the stress that often drives disease. Holy Cross Hospital offers the following suggestions to keep your good health:

•Discover and rediscover what makes your life meaningful. Find what brings your life purpose and align your choices with it. Wherever your passion is, there you’ll find your purpose.

•Nurture your connection with God/your Higher Power through regular spiritual practices.  Some people choose prayer, others meditate, some read Scripture, others walk through nature. Whatever helps you in your relationship with the Divine, make time to foster your awareness of the Sacred.  

•Connect with others who share your values. Having meaningful relationships with others, which focus on what is important to us, reminds us that we are not alone and can often bring joy to our lives.

•Find opportunities to serve. Helping others in need, either through volunteer work or some other means, nurtures our spirit when we feel our actions make a positive difference for other people.  

Last, but not least, getting annual physicals and tests from your doctor is key in sustaining your health and preventing diseases like diabetes and high blood pressure. Having a Primary Care Physician (PCP) who can coordinate your care is vital to your good health. A PCP typically specializes in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine or General Practice. 

If you don’t have a PCP, finding one is easy! Just visit your insurance carrier’s website, look for the “find a doctor” area and follow the instructions. Or click here. Stay on top of your health education by subscribing to our e-newsletter.


Five years and one million heart attacks and strokes Part II

  • Posted Sep 27, 2011
  • Alan Niederman, MD, FACC, FACP

In my last blog I documented the problem and some of the proposed fixes in a planned attempt to lower the stroke and heart attack rate.  Some good news is that there is finally a realization that often patients don’t get or take medications in the way we want them to because they simply don’t have the money to buy them.  One of the goals of this plan is to reduce or eliminate co-pays or deductibles for these medications.  Indeed one of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, if it survives, is the elimination of the “doughnut hole."  The “doughnut hole” was another attempt by the Bush administration to get something without paying for it.  Everything has to be paid for at one point.  We as a nation should be able to decide what is important and figure out how to pay for it.  We went to the moon.  We have no excuse.

Medicare is planning to waive patient co-pays for blood pressure and cholesterol screening.  Smoking cessation work will also be waived.  In addition there is a new annual wellness visit in which these issues will be prominently featured.

Now let’s touch on the fun parts.  They, and you, know who “they” are are going to go after, our beloved french fries.  This has already happened to a great extent.  It is now almost impossible to smoke unless it is in your car and probably a sensor is being developed so that if you are smoking in your car the motor will turn off.  First it's texting, then it's talking and now smoking.  Soon cars will only be used to get from place to place.

Trans fats have already gotten the axe and have been virtually removed from food.  Salt is next up.  Soon, no salt will be allowed anywhere.  Reducing salt is definitely good for your blood pressure and certainly helps with fluid retention, and I am a big fan of avoiding pickles.

Part of this is of course missing the point.  It doesn’t matter if the french fries or potato chips don’t have trans fat.  You shouldn’t be eating them anyway.  And, if you are, you might as well have something that tastes good.  Is the government really supposed to be our mother?  Is effective health policy really run from McDonalds?  The figures quoted to date are that the reduction of trans fats in food is estimated to reduced 50,000 deaths per year, but I am not familiar with how that number is derived.  Perhaps we just eat smarter.

Don’t get me wrong.  I am enthusiastic that finally the problem maybe getting the attention it needs.  I write about these issues every week.  Many of our problems are self inflicted.  I, like most everyone else, eat too much, exercises too little and don't get enough sleep.

No matter how much government does, we ourselves need to take control of our own destiny.  We have to control what we eat, we have to monitor our own blood pressure and take responsibility for our own health.  It’s your problem.  Own it.  If your doctor won’t help, you find another; there are enough to go around.


Let’s hear it for potato chips

  • Posted Jul 14, 2011
  • Alan Niederman, MD, FACC, FACP

It must be the summer as the level of science has dropped, but the level of important information has remained at an all time high.  We now have an article that included 120,877 men and women who were all healthcare professionals.  They were followed for up to 20 years. The participants in this study gained an average of 3.35 pounds every four years.  This number correlates with our general medical belief that people gain an average of 10 pounds a decade.

Published in the N Engl J Med 2011; 364:2392-2404 this study proved once and for all that eating potato chips causes obesity.  This is followed in second place by eating potatoes or fries.  The best foods to eat are yogurt and nuts.  It should also not be a surprise that drinking sugar sweetened beverages of any kind wasn’t such a good idea either.  No calorie soda seems to be ok.  I told you not to super size it. One of the most surprising findings was that it doesn’t seem to matter what type of dairy products you eat.  There was no apparent difference between fat, low fat and no fat milk and other products so I guess we can go back to milk that tastes like milk.  At least my cappuccino will taste better. This article also sheds light on the eternal foolishness of low carb, high carb, no carb, low fat, etc. etc. that is the fodder of every magazine in this country except the National Review.  (Unless they are discussing what Ronald Regan ate for breakfast)  Here it is, the unblemished truth directly from the paper:  “changes in the consumption of refined or processed foods and liquid carbohydrates or alcohol (OH NO) were positively associated with weight gain, whereas changes in the consumption of unprocessed foods such as whole grains, fruits, nuts and vegetables were inversely associated with weight gain.” If you eat the way we eat now you, are doomed to gain weight.  If you eat like we did in 1776, you are set.  I wonder where Veal Parmesan fits in.  This is probably the reason the Italians who live in Italy have never heard of it.

I have more good news.  As I have blogged before, watching TV will kill you.  That is unless you watch it standing up and while doing something (like exercising) and not eating potato chips and drinking soda.  It may be as bad as smoking but not quite.  This of course does not relate to watching anything with Oprah in it, which is allowed at all times and gets a free pass. Speaking of smoking, when you stop, it does seem to cause an initial weight gain but then is responsible for little change after.  The benefits of not smoking clearly outweigh the risks of smoking even if you gain weight. Either good or bad is the news that 50 to 100 kcal of energy either way is enough to cause a weight gain or loss over time.  This probably accounts for the constant refrain that I and most physicians hear, which is that I eat nothing and can’t lose weight. Let’s summarize.  I know you have heard it before but it seems to be the best way to lose weight. Get some exercise daily.  The more you do, the less you will weigh.  Eat as much non processed food as possible.  We might have to go back to cooking.  Don’t smoke.  Don’t watch TV.  Live long and prosper.


About Holy Cross Hospital

Holy Cross Hospital is a nonprofit, Catholic hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, dedicated to innovative, high quality and compassionate care. For nearly six decades, Holy Cross has continuously expanded its services to provide leading-edge care for their patients in Florida and for those from elsewhere in the United States. Holy Cross also offers an International Services program to ensure that patients from outside the U.S. receive the care they need.

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